Teablog.in

A Rose Bloomed in Desert

A rose bloomed in the desert:  I am waiting for the season in which your love does not rain

Thus, Pramesh fell in love with Mala at first sight. But if you have met for marriage, you have to ask two-five questions. ‘How much have you studied?’ Pramesh asked. However, Pramesh’s parents were not at all interested in this question. What to do with an educated daughter-in-law? Where does he have a job? It was a big bungalow. There was beautiful furniture. The bride-to-be added to the furniture as a beautiful show piece. If the daughter-in-law is educated, she should fill the pods in front of the mother-in-law.  Mala replied confidently, ‘I have done diploma in physical training with gold medal.’ Mala Purohit. Is that your name? Sounds like heard somewhere.’ Mala laughed. A pretty girl doesn’t smile shyly but a girl bursting with confidence smiles easily. He revealed, ‘You may not have heard my name but you must have read it. My name has flashed four-five times in the media.

I am a medalist in a sports event. I have played Nationals.’ Pramesh refrained from going into further details. He was not at all interested in being a girl and doing long and short jumps or galloping like a colt. A woman whose mind protects her family during the day and her husband’s bed at night is called a wife. What does a sporting event have to do with this? Pramesh completed the formality by asking one or two more unnecessary questions.

In the presence of the families of both parties, he declared, ‘I like Mala.’ While saying this, Pramesh knew that the girl and her family were also going to like him. What desperate girl doesn’t like the most eligible bachelors like Pramesh? Pramesh’s mother also liked the garland. Mala’s personality was different from other girls. She could not be called very fair, but her face was full of beauty.

There was determination in its grasp. Anne’s dock was long and strong. Her shoulders and both arms were so beautiful and strong that anyone could tell that this girl was used to housework.

The most attractive thing about his personality is his confidence. Be it a woman or a man, Mala’s eyes had the ability to scare him away. Pramesh’s mother did not like this very much. He came home and said, ‘Mala seemed fine in all other ways, but I think it is a bit headstrong. Any girl who has come to see Murtio for the first time would shyly talk. If Murtia’s parents are present, the girl’s eyes will not raise.

How was this instead of shying away from us? If the mother had walked, she would have declared the bride as invalid! They wanted a very loose, nervous, shy and shy bride. Instead of a timid deer, this turned out to be a prancing mare! But the mother was helpless because the son was crazy about this mare.

 Mom was right. Pramesh was really shocked to see Mala. Having got Mala as his wife, he was quick to become rich. Pramesh got married to Mala. Pramesh’s father spends money like water on the wedding and in return brings home a watery bride like Mala. On the first night of marriage, Pramesh realized that his life had become.

Mala was more beautiful than it looked. Exhausted from the day’s work, Pramesh used to spring up in the bedroom with renewed energy. The moon rises and Pritam wakes up! Pramesh kept his Padmani awake all night. Pramesh was not exposed. After waking up early in the morning till five o’clock, he used to prostrate like a killed lion and was awake till ten o’clock.

Whatever was the problem was Mala’s. His eyes were not found, but Sasuma’s voice was heard from outside the bedroom door, ‘Mala, are you listening? It’s six o’clock. It is time for your father-in-law to have tea.

Very dead. Now get out.’ Who will tell Sasuma that your son has not given time to sleep. Mala used to get busy with housework while wearing a rosy look in her eyes. In the afternoon, Parwari came from the kitchen and when Mala went a little sideways, Sasuma’s order was heard, ‘Mala, these clothes are piled up.

Who will iron it? So far I have done everything. Now I am old, you take care of it. One and a half to two hours would pass in ironing. The evening was melting back into the kitchen. Sister used to come to cook morning and evening, but Mala had to stand to help her. It was ten o’clock in the dinner party. The night shift started there again. 

How long can a body, no matter how tough and sport-hardened, withstand a day’s housework and an all-night ‘barakam’? Mala got fever. Mala’s mother came to know about this. One day he came to see his daughter. Sasuma said, ‘There can be no bigger question than that the bridegroom’s pier is in the same village.

If you want to take the mala, take it every night at ten o’clock and put it back in the morning. Who will do housework without it? I have become old now. There, Pramesh spoke up, ‘No, ho! If you want to take the mala, take it during the day time. At night without me…’ Mala opened her mouth for the first time after her father-in-law came. Sasuma said, ‘Why do you say ‘Umar hai’, ‘Umar hai’ in conversation? You don’t age every afternoon when you hold a kitty party with your sisters and chat or dance in the name of dance. 

Your 80-80 kg sisters and you look like a dozen buffalo jumping in unison when you bang on Punjabi songs!’ No one expected that the daughter-in-law, who had been silent until now, would suddenly whip out a tongue-shaped whip. The mother-in-law looked at her son and pumped, ‘What’s going on? Your bye says so and you are sitting! Teach him why to speak.  Mala’s mother saw that the matter was getting worse so she went back without taking her daughter. Seeing that Mala was silent, Pramesh felt that she was scared.

Day by day it started to increase in number. He started mishandling his wife in small matters. One day he crossed the limit. Pramesh came home that night at twelve o’clock. He asked Mala, ‘What has been made for dinner?’ Mala said, ‘Khichdi, curry and millet rotala.’ Don’t you know I don’t like bread? Get some hot bhajiya for me.’ Mala protested for the first time, ‘There will be no bhajiya now.’ If you want to eat, eat otherwise drink milk and go to sleep.’

Hearing this Pramesh jumped up. He raised his right hand in the air to slap the garland. That’s it! This was his ultimate manhood. Mala took the position. He made a strange noise from his throat and wrung his hands. There was a booming sound. Pramesh jumped in the air and hit the bed. One of his hands and two teeth were broken. Mala opened the door. Sasuma was standing there. Mala said, ‘Take care of your male son.

During the marriage interview he forgot to ask me in which sports event I was a medalist. I say today. I have played Nationals in martial arts. Convince your son to stop treating a twenty-first century woman like a sixteenth century man. I’m going to sleep. I will get up at nine in the morning. Until then no one disturbs me.

 

 

Leave a Comment